Which stone?

stone

Which stone can bear exposure to water, heat, sharp knives, and more thus providing the best worktop in a Kitchen?

To an outsider, it may not seem like such a big issue, “it’s merely a countertop”, “if I am able to cook on it, it’s good enough” but is it really? You can use it once and get the best results: no problems or issues, no damage, no extra cleaning. But no one uses it just once! Once you invest in a new kitchen, you have to just hope you made the right choices because you can’t change your mind so easily; that would waste a lot of time, effort and money. That’s why before picking whatever looks good or seems good, you must research on it… And that’s what this article will help you do.

  • Granite – This is the countertop material to pick when factors like money are no problem. So if you’re on a tight budget, it’s probably best to skip this paragraph. Granite exceeds it’s title as just a countertop material as it defines the kitchen. When granite is present, the kitchen automatically seems so much better. But granite is so much more than just a good looking material. It can withhold great amounts of heat, is available in a variety of shades such as whites, greens, blues, corals and beiges. Furthermore, they are really low maintenance, once they are installed, no special care is needed since they are extremely hard and can handle their job well. As I already mentioned, probably the biggest downside of granite countertops are the prices. They are getting cheaper but still, the prices are quite high and if improperly installed, the job will need to be done twice. So if you’re going to install granite countertops, do it right the first time!
  • Solid Surfacing – This is made primarily from acrylic and polyester. It is virtually maintenance free – no sealing or special cleaning required. No cracks are present (to trap dirt or debris) since seamless installation is used and lastly, you can also get them in a rainbow of colours and patterns since the look of them doesn’t really have to be “natural”. On the other hand that can make solid surface counters look fake and artificial. And even though scratches and burns can be sanded out, it can be a lot of effort because it doesn’t stand up to hot pans or sharp knives.
  • Quartz Surfacing – Fashioned from resin and quartz chips tinged with colour, quartz surfacing provides a perfect balance between ease of caring and beauty of the stone. It has a non-porous surface that helps resist scratches and it is much harder with depth, lucidity and radiance that can’t be found in other solid surfaces. Lastly, despite it being relatively pricey, its permanency can make it a worthy investment.
  • Marble – Unmatched in terms of its luminosity and distinctive patterns, it’s a choice everyone would pick if they could. Because of it’s monetary value, marble is rarely seen on the countertops of whole kitchens – many limit it to one or two small areas. As well as just looking good in your kitchen, it is waterproof and heatproof. However, marble needs constant maintenance as it is highly susceptible to stains, scratches and chipping.
  • Tile – This seems to be an excellent choice for secondary work surfaces, like islands, eat-at counters, wet bars etc. as it can be quite a demanding countertop surface with proneness to staining and damage from standing moisture. Furthermore, the uneven surface provided by tiles can make it difficult to roll out a pie crust or balance a cutting board. However, it is long-lasting and effortless to clean. On top of that, it is inexpensive and can holds its own against heat and sharp knives. Tiles offer endless options for colours and designs while working with almost any kitchen style, from impressive Old World to simply country styled kitchens.
  • Laminate – These counters are primarily made from kraft paper tinctured with resins fused to particle board. With a smooth surface that is really easy to clean and maintain, laminate countertops have been the backbone of many kitchens for decades. If you are on a tight budget, it’s a surprisingly great choice to pick as it is one of the most affordable countertop materials. On the downside, they susceptible to scratching, burning and if chipped, they are almost impossible to repair.
  • Concrete – In kitchens with oddly shaped and oddly placed countertops, concrete would be the best material to choose as it is usually cast right in your kitchen and tailored perfectly for you. Concrete stands up well to heavy use while simultaneously being heat and scratch resistant. Nevertheless, concrete is very heavy and will need strong support beneath. Lastly, without frequent sealing, it can stain easily. So if you’d like concrete countertops, be sure to keep it topped up!
  • Butcher block – Wooden countertops provide a beautiful warm look for your kitchen and can be found in a wide range of colours, patterns and finishes. They are especially suitable for traditional cottage-style and country kitchens. Despite being smooth and easy to clean, it is a mating home for bacteria and needs frequent disinfecting. There is a high possibility it will get scratched from knives but many people like the shop-worn look it develops. If you don’t, you can sand scratches down with ease.

In conclusion, it all narrows down to your budget and your preference. Concrete countertops might not be your cup of tea but if you have oddly shaped countertops, it might be the only material that works best. And while anyone would love to have granite countertops; if you’re on a tight budget, sadly you’ll have to let go of the idea. If you are looking for natural stone for your home please visit polishgranite website

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